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Rebellious youth, however, turned to Leap-Jump and Deva, two styles that made heavier use of guitar and were generally *loud*. Leap-Jump was noted for its emphasis on danceability and percussion; it sang songs of typical teenage experiences of love, work, school, fights with your parents, and having your city bombed. 'Sah-Lee, we're in trouble again' is regarded as a classic of the genre, performed by a trio of Sullustan brothers from the Ayz'Pahrts clan. More political songs became known as Boom-Leap-Jump; all such songs were banned with the end of the Republic. Deva was more experimental; some songs were entirely whimsical with nonsense words; others were more like song collages, where each individual line expressed a single thought and the lines collectively conveyed a sense of mood, place, or experience. Perhaps the most famous piece is 'The Death of My Grandfather', an incredibly melancholy song. For reasons the Hutts will not reveal, Deva is banned in Hutt Space. This sparked a brief flurry of 'Hutts are dumb and ugly' songs, which ended with the performers all killing themselves spectacularly, such as the one who blew up his own audience.
Rebellious youth, however, turned to Leap-Jump and Deva, two styles that made heavier use of guitar and were generally *loud*. Leap-Jump was noted for its emphasis on danceability and percussion; it sang songs of typical teenage experiences of love, work, school, fights with your parents, and having your city bombed. 'Sah-Lee, we're in trouble again' is regarded as a classic of the genre, performed by a trio of Sullustan brothers from the Ayz'Pahrts clan. More political songs became known as Boom-Leap-Jump; all such songs were banned with the end of the Republic, but normal Leap-Jump is still legal. Deva was more experimental; some songs were entirely whimsical with nonsense words; others were more like song collages, where each individual line expressed a single thought and the lines collectively conveyed a sense of mood, place, or experience. Perhaps the most famous piece is 'The Death of My Grandfather', an incredibly melancholy song. For reasons the Hutts will not reveal, Deva is banned in Hutt Space. This sparked a brief flurry of 'Hutts are dumb and ugly' songs, which ended with the performers all killing themselves spectacularly, such as the one who blew up his own audience.

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During the Clone Wars, the most important single figure of music of the last fifty years appeared, DJ Dooku. His true identity remains unrevealed; records make it clear that he and Sith Lord Dooku, the leader of the Confederation, were never even on the same planet at the same time. His voice and appearance, however, were the same, and his incredibly kinetic remixes spawned an endless army of imitators. He was allegedly slaughtered by clone troopers during the Jedi Purge, but no body was ever found. Two of his disciples, however, established the pattern for what would become known as Mix music: every party is led by a Mixmaster who creates the music and the Chanter, who lays down words on top of the music samples. Mix music is not banned by the Empire in bulk, but any time it becomes political, that particular Dyad are hunted down and killed. It continues to grow in popularity today.

Many brief lived genres of music flourished in the CIS, but perhaps the most dominant was Orchestral Hammer; this involved repurposing older orchestras, now desperate for money, to play popular music. The sheer size of an orchestra gave huge power to tunes, and Orchestral Hammer remains licit today because it was rarely political. Zandar Rho and his 80 Piece Orchestra are perhaps the most famous such band, noted especially for their piece 'You made my heart explode' which incorporates the sound of a star going nova.

During this period, a group of music history students revived an old form of music dating back to the Mandalorian Wars, known as 'Zinthy'. Zinthy was based on weaving together brainwave patterns and converting them into sound. It is a Fullsynth genre and modern examples are known as Neo-Zinthy. The most successful such band is Paft Dunk; it remains unclear what species they are; some think they may be Free Droids. They speak only through voice synthesizers... it's not even clear what their genders are, or if they even come from a gendered species.

No major new genres have emerged yet in the new Imperial Era, but certainly the Empire is primed for new musics. Who knows what exciting trends the future will bring?



A Brief History of Contemporary Music

The history of music in the Galaxy is so long and so big that no one knows it all; even holding the big picture in your head is basically impossible; much past music is lost, found only in data crystals no longer decipherable or in other media. One of the oldest ruins on Sullust has music inscribed on five meter tall wheels, apparently designed to be rotated on an axis as a group sang, with the words you are singing right now framed by a second device which can be moved up and down, as each verse is in a series of concentric rings; this appears to have driven a style of music in which each line is shorter than the one before, starting with lines that are very very long and gradually getting shorter. This is thought to be the distant origin of the Sullustian poetic style known as 'Quarrit', in which you have a 17 syllable line, a 13 syllable line, an 11 syllable line, a 7 syllable line, a five syllable line, and finally a three syllable line, ending with a single character which sets the overall tone. In the best poems, the final character forces reinterpretation of the whole thing. This involves heavy referencing of longer, fancier poems to provide context. This sadly means this ancient, fine style is now mainly a party game or else an art for pretentious poetry snobs. A pity.

There are many ways to group contemporary music; one of the most common is 'Fullsynth', 'Recorded' and 'Live'. Full Synth is generated electronically and is often rather experimental. Certain genres are entirely done in a Fullsynth manner. Neo-Synthy, a revival of an Old Republic style from nearly a thousand years ago, where brainwaves are converted into music and mixed together, is one such style. Recorded music is recorded on live instruments and live music is, well, music experienced live. Both may involve some use of electronic instruments, such as keyboard synthesizers, and recorded music often uses electronic mixing methods. The boundaries are thus often blurred.

It is generally agreed, except by those who like drek, that music in the decades just before the last decades of the Old Republic had become boring, bland, and repetitive or else so idiosyncratic that only individual species liked it or else had been turned into propaganda by the space conglomerates and the other major groups whose rise destroyed the Old Republic from within. The reader is referred to the following sound file: CorrellianCoffee?.nh1977 Warning: This may stick in your brains for days. o/~ Correllian Coffee / Makes the Coffee Run / To your Tastebuds / In less than 1.2 seconds o/~ Aaargh.

Two new genres of music exploded about twenty years before the Battle of Naboo. Droidtime was music written by humans and performed by droids; it made heavy use of complex beat structures, syncopation, and electronic droid noises. Most importantly, unlike the formal, complex orchestral pieces written for formal events and rich patrons, you could *dance* to it. It rushed through the galaxy like a cleansing tide, ushering in a new era of music.

Droidtime was accompanied by Scramble, which took many kinds of music and blended them together electronically; ironically, corporate propaganda had a lot of the best music and thus many pieces were evocative of such and thus subject to constant lawsuits and law enforcement; Scramble became sort of illegal but essentially impossible to stop outside corporate sectors and sometimes inside them.

Droidtime, however, had a problem, and that problem was that droids were expensive and keeping them functional was expensive; there was a hunger for a cheaper way to make good music and that came in the form of Jatz. Droidtime had stimulated the rise of modern composers and now people began adapting older instruments or, in one of the signature moves of Jatz, turning other things into instruments. The Tattooine Blues, which arose in the urban clubs of the criminal cities of Tattooine, is noted for using instruments made from podracers and moisture collectors. Jatz musicians took older tunes and especially took Droidtime tunes and converted them to be played by people and included a heavy element of improvisation. Jatz arose in places with many urban poor, criminals, and even slaves, and Jatz bands had highly unstable memberships and an emphasis on improvisation. Jatz's origins made it unsavory to many of the better off Citizens of the Galaxy, but it became popular with their kids, who eventually grew up and began forming their own Jatz bands and recording companies began to offer contracts. A split developed between original Jatz and what was often known as 'Club Jatz' or 'Dance Jatz', performed by better off folk who sang about being poor and living on the streets and struggling to survive, while living in comfortable apartments on the 283rd floor of the great housing towers of Corruscant and other major worlds.

The Clone Wars sparked an explosion of musical styles; it increased contact between planets... sometimes violently... and led people within the CIS to try to develop new forms of music suitable for a new, better state. It also led to both martial music and anti-war music.

The massive need for more weapons led to a manufacturing boom; some workers were inspired to create what they called 'War Industrial' Music, which mixed the sounds of industrial machines to produce tunes, sometimes new ones, sometimes industrial version of older tunes. Foundry Number Seven became the most famous such band, able to leave their old jobs behind and become full time musicians.

Clone Soldiers in the military proved unusually musically talented; a popular genre among them became known as 'Jedi Trance', a kind of haunting, ethereal fullsynth intended to induce peaceful, meditiative states. Jedi themselves proved fond of it. Unfortunately, the Empire has banned it... which has now made it a favorite of would-be rebels. Clone soldiers also revived traditional martial music and were quite fond of that; when they wanted to dance, they mixed their marching tunes with Jatz to produce War Jatz, which shows the glories and horrors of war from a soldier's perspective, often using instruments adapted from weapons and war vehicle parts. Last Stand on Canis 369 is considered *the* classic of the genre.

This period also saw the evolution of 'Club' or 'Dance' Jatz into 'Smooth' Jatz. This is much beloved by the urban elites and middle class and an abomination against the Force, all living things, all dead things and even the void of space itself by traditional Jatz fans. It is frequently used as a morale builder in Imperial offices and transport and relies heavily on woodwinds and soft strings.

Rebellious youth, however, turned to Leap-Jump and Deva, two styles that made heavier use of guitar and were generally *loud*. Leap-Jump was noted for its emphasis on danceability and percussion; it sang songs of typical teenage experiences of love, work, school, fights with your parents, and having your city bombed. 'Sah-Lee, we're in trouble again' is regarded as a classic of the genre, performed by a trio of Sullustan brothers from the Ayz'Pahrts clan. More political songs became known as Boom-Leap-Jump; all such songs were banned with the end of the Republic, but normal Leap-Jump is still legal. Deva was more experimental; some songs were entirely whimsical with nonsense words; others were more like song collages, where each individual line expressed a single thought and the lines collectively conveyed a sense of mood, place, or experience. Perhaps the most famous piece is 'The Death of My Grandfather', an incredibly melancholy song. For reasons the Hutts will not reveal, Deva is banned in Hutt Space. This sparked a brief flurry of 'Hutts are dumb and ugly' songs, which ended with the performers all killing themselves spectacularly, such as the one who blew up his own audience.

During the Clone Wars, the most important single figure of music of the last fifty years appeared, DJ Dooku. His true identity remains unrevealed; records make it clear that he and Sith Lord Dooku, the leader of the Confederation, were never even on the same planet at the same time. His voice and appearance, however, were the same, and his incredibly kinetic remixes spawned an endless army of imitators. He was allegedly slaughtered by clone troopers during the Jedi Purge, but no body was ever found. Two of his disciples, however, established the pattern for what would become known as Mix music: every party is led by a Mixmaster who creates the music and the Chanter, who lays down words on top of the music samples. Mix music is not banned by the Empire in bulk, but any time it becomes political, that particular Dyad are hunted down and killed. It continues to grow in popularity today.

Many brief lived genres of music flourished in the CIS, but perhaps the most dominant was Orchestral Hammer; this involved repurposing older orchestras, now desperate for money, to play popular music. The sheer size of an orchestra gave huge power to tunes, and Orchestral Hammer remains licit today because it was rarely political. Zandar Rho and his 80 Piece Orchestra are perhaps the most famous such band, noted especially for their piece 'You made my heart explode' which incorporates the sound of a star going nova.

During this period, a group of music history students revived an old form of music dating back to the Mandalorian Wars, known as 'Zinthy'. Zinthy was based on weaving together brainwave patterns and converting them into sound. It is a Fullsynth genre and modern examples are known as Neo-Zinthy. The most successful such band is Paft Dunk; it remains unclear what species they are; some think they may be Free Droids. They speak only through voice synthesizers... it's not even clear what their genders are, or if they even come from a gendered species.

No major new genres have emerged yet in the new Imperial Era, but certainly the Empire is primed for new musics. Who knows what exciting trends the future will bring?